The Hidden Mental Costs of Climate Change

A new report from the World Health Organization warns that the climate crisis is already spreading disease, and could also trigger anxiety, depression, and PTSD.

People don’t really understand—until you actually see it coming at you in a wall of flame,” says a woman in the Rural Fire Service of New South Wales, in startling footage of Australia’s raging bushfires. Extreme weather events like these are becoming more frequent and more severe: in the U.S. just this year, five states have set wildfire records. But it’s not just unlucky homeowners who are affected—fine particulate matter is an increasing concern for epidemiologists, who’ve found that public exposure can cause both acute and chronic disease.

Alaska’s Rural Fishing Communities Are The Next Front-Line of Covid-19

As thousands of workers flow into remote parts of the state for the start of the season, a patchwork of rules and a lack of enforcement has locals worried.

As thousands of workers flow into remote parts of the state for the start of the season, a patchwork of rules and a lack of enforcement has locals worried.

In a normal season, the village of Naknek in southwestern Alaska would be bustling by the end of May, with people arriving from all over the world to work Bristol Bay’s renowned salmon run.

The village’s population of around 500 swells as over 13,000 workers come to Bristol Bay to spend about six weeks fishing, canning and cleaning the products of the world’s primary source of wild-caught sockeye salmon.

This year, with the season opening just days away, “it still feels like a ghost town,” said Nels Ure, a second-generation Bristol Bay fisherman. Because of the pandemic, “it’s not business as usual.

Something to Smile About

A dental program reaches far-flung patients living in rural Alaska.

Janette Ulak recalls her time working as a dental assistant in private practice and in the Air Force, when she was limited to helping dentists set up, or assisting during procedures. Today, however, she’s the one performing essential dental services, working with three Alaska Native communities. “The table has turned,” she said.

Ulak is a 2018 graduate of the Alaska Dental Therapist Education Program and is now a dental health aide therapist with the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corp. based in Hooper Bay. “I wanted to be here, helping my people.